Searching for the lost generation


It’s a shame and a shock. Nearly 11 children go missing in India ev­ery hour and at least four of th­em are never found, says a study.

The report by Bachpan Bachao An­dolan (BBA) covers 392 of India’s 640 districts and is the first such co­m­prehensive study on the subject. The data was compiled over two ye­a­rs from January 2008 to January 2010.

Most of the missing children are from poor families and the biggest reason why many remain untraced is because of the apathy of the police and law enforcement agencies. The report, Missing Children in India, a pioneering study was released in Delhi in December.

It is based on data from the government-controlled National Crime Record Bureau, the National Human Rights Commission, various child rights groups and information obtained under the Right to Information Act.

The report says 117,480 children went missing between January 2008 and January 2010 in 392 districts in 20 states and four federally-governed territories.

Based on the findings, the group estimates that the total number of children who go missing every year in India could be as high as 96,000.

Rightists and child welfare associations also point to possibility of organ trade. The organ trade is an international racket, which is a multi-billion business.

“This is a grave issue that brooks no delay in action. We demand that the State government must initiate a thorough inquiry into these cases apart from strengthening anti-trafficking cells. The apex investigation agency in the country — the CBI — also op­ened an Anti-Trafficking Cell recen­tly. But the Irony here is that many people in the State don’t know about this cell. The CBI should also rewa­rd people who tip them off on organised gangs who are involved in woman trafficking,” says Sandhya, leader, Progressive Organisation for Women.

The State government must initiate a thorough inquiry into these cases apart from strengthening anti-trafficking cells.

The apex investigation agency in the country —the CBI — has opened an Anti-Trafficking Cell recently. But the irony here is that many people in the State don’t know about this cell. The CBI should also reward people who tip them off on organised gangs who are involved in woman trafficking.

Sandhya, leader, Progressive Organisation for Women (POW)

 

Disturbing numbers

Missing children (since 2008) – 6,019

Traced – 2,109

Largest chunk — Girls in the 12-15 age group

Missing girls (2008–11), Hyderabad – 974

Missing girls (2008–11), Cyberabad – 511

Possible destination — Flesh/ porn trade

65 per cent of missing children remain untraced

Child rights activists fear that the untraced children may have already landed in flesh-trade rackets

 

Sensational cases persuaded, ordinary left to fate

ACP of Crime Control Station CCS Chiti Babu said, a missing case is registered after 48 hours of a person is reported missing.

Routinely, we issue a lookout notice and later get the person in question published in local newspapers and telecast on television channels. Some other measures, like approaching mobile service providers to mark the tower from where the person made the last call is exercised. In Crime Control Station (CCS), a team of 4 or 5 cops work on tracing missing people. The ACP is frank in admitting that beyond these measures nothing much is done except in the case of sensational cases.

In such cases a special team is constituted and interstate alerts given. In certain cases police send a team to possible spots across the nation to trace out the missing person in co-operation with the local police of that state.

Police officers also say that in the case of girls and boys of late teens, elopement is also common. In such cases things become clear only after some time. Unlike kids, they are most likely to return home when money they have, is exhausted or the initial enthusiasm evaporates.

Source:  Postnoon, Human Trafficking News Daily

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